11 February 2012

Eros & Psyche

E&S


I really love old books and antique book shops. Charing Cross is the promised land to any old book lover in the world. This one was from an infamous second hand and antique bookshop who also sells new books; but I can't remember the name right now, so I'll pass that. I have a whole bunch old books date back to late 1880s -I can't afford that massive 16th century poetry book of course and it's a pain for my heart- and Eros & Psyche is definitely going to be a favorite. I love the story.

E&S
E&S
E&S
E&S
E&S


Do you like old books or you're the brand new publishes kind of person? Or maybe ebooks even? I pledge to read the printed word. x

10 comments:

  1. I adore old books... I've decided to start a collection, but it's very difficult to find them in a reasonable price in Greece. I've realised that the best option is to buy English-language books from non-English speaking countries. When I was in the Netherlands last year I bought a 1916 collection of Shelley's works in English in pristine condition for 12 euro, and a re-bound, english-language 800-pages volume of a 1837 edition of Byron's Works. For 35 euros! Actually this particular one - my favourite and oldest edition I own - has given me a headache. Under examination the cover proves to be more recent than the facimiles and the typed pages (hence the rebound), there is no mention of a second edition. I've looked into archives of descriptions of editions of Byron's collected works and found that the design of the page is as mentioned there for that particular 1837 edition. The paper is clearly 19th century. Under the preface it reads March 31, 1837. However, the roman numerals on the first page read MCCCCXXXVII (1437), which made no sense. I've reached the conclusion that the edition has a typo, and the roman numerals should read MDCCCXXXVII, like the 1837 in the preface. What do you think? Oops, I got carried away there. Sorry about the book rant! I love this blog! Clio

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    1. Cliooooo! I'm so excited that you're here yay! And I feel your pain about the limited resources for old books, same here in Turkey. Bleh. That's why I love London, lol. And Byron's works! I am so jealous, I love Byron. I am not sure about the roman number confusion but it must be a 1873 publish. Must be a print error or something. (Come visit my blog! Thank you for the comment xx)

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    2. Actually writing this to you made it all clear in my head, I realised I had read it wrong a whole year now and it made me very happy to finally be sure about that book! *does a little jig* I love Byron too, and this book has fantastic source material. It's always a strain when you're around old books in a shop to remind yourself not to jump at the nearest tattered copy but to look for a subject that really interests you, because it's money better spend and more enjoyable, I think, to actually want to read from your collection.

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    3. I agree, totally. Even the look of an old book is very tempting to me so I intend to buy anything with a shattered cover and that sharp, lovely smell of a really old book. [The only things I carried back home from London are (old and new) books - and I mean 'books'. I had to take one as the only hand baggage since it was a gigantic one and I sold my soul the moment I saw it, so i had to injure my shoulder for it's sake, lol.]

      But when you find something that you really love, it's really amazing. I love reading poetry from antique books and your book is simply amazing! I never thought it would be such a rich big source, it seems to have everything in it. Lucky lucky you. x

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  2. You know I love books - old books hold a special place in my heart. I have an 18-something edition of Keats poems, bound in leather with the cutest owl on the cover. It's one of my favourite objects. I bought it for less than 4 USD. (I don't have it with me at the moment so I can't check the exact date. :)

    I find it amazing how little the design of books had changed since they first appeared. I love objects like that. Something as perfect as a book really doesn't need to look different! (The same with umbrellas. They still look the same, don't they? Perfect design.)

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    1. Oooh! Umbrellas, how I love umbrellas. Sadly the sources for old and classy umbrellas are even more limited than the books - so I'll bear with it and keep on admiring the photography instead, sigh... Things I'd do if I had a lot of money.

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  3. I love the printed word, and I swore off Kindle until I got one for Christmas and now... now, I'm a follower. But I still love real, physical books!

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  4. The bookshops on Charing Cross road are amazing aren't they? I love old books, almost everything I read is second hand - either from friends and family or via charity shops. I especially love coming across books with dedications or notes in the front cover, and wondering about who it was who owned it before me.

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    1. They are really amazing! And I get very excited when I find a few words from the former owner, especially if it has a date somewhere next to it. It's like sneaking into someone's thoughts.

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  5. oh old books..their scent is absolutely amazing!Last November my brother got me some old hardcover books from Camden in London and I was sooo excited!!

    I really liked your blog, and I noticed you're from Turkey and at this time of my life i'm struggling to learn turkish!!

    xx
    Eleni
    http://noeudrose.blogspot.com

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